ACT State of the Environment 2007

Indicator: Transport

Summary

Private motor vehicles remain the dominant mode of transport in the ACT, as they continue to be more accessible and convenient than walking, cycling or taking public transport. Average kilometres travelled per ACT vehicle decreased over the reporting period (13,600 km in 2006 compared to 15,100 km in 2003) and the ACT now rates significantly below the national average of 14,600 km travelled per vehicle in 2006. Indeed, between 2004 and 2006, the ACT was the only jurisdiction to record an overall decline in vehicular travel. This has occurred during a period in which the number of vehicles in the ACT increased from 212,072 to 220,827. Reasons for the decrease in kilometers traveled are unknown but it could be simply a reduction in interstate travel by car and an increase in air travel. However, data on air and rail travel is not available, nor is motor transport either public (including a taxi with a single passenger) or the personal car (including that of a large family).

Compared with other Australians travelling to and from work, Canberrans used their cars more (81%) but also cycled more (2.5%), walked more (4.9%), used public transport less (7.9%) and less frequently car-pooled. The decrease in car-pooling is a concern, as it should be the easiest form of sustainable travel to arrange, because it simply involves filling empty seats in cars that are already travelling (Mees, Sorupia and Stone 2007). An increase in cycling (a sustainable form of transport) has followed construction of on-road cycle laneways during the reporting period.

Sustainable transport options are a key issue for the ACT. The level of car-dependence (and wasted seats in already travelling vehicles) in the ACT is not ecologically sustainable because it entails a high level of non-renewable energy use and greenhouse gas emissions. Transport in the ACT contributes approximately 23% of total ACT greenhouse gas emissions (see Greenhouse indicator).

In assessing the efficiency of public transport, measures of transport efficiency are required, for instance calculations of persons per kilometre travelled (a 'PK ratio') and of daily commuting time for both public and personal transport. For example, the ACT needs a more environmentally sustainable transport infrastructure that moves beyond a public/private transport dichotomy and prioritises transportation on a person per kilometre calculus; the T2 lane system is an example of this approach.

The sensitivity of bus usage, and therefore efficiency, to budget resources was demonstrated both by an increased usage from 16,305,000 trips in 2003–04 to 16,928,000 trips in 2005–06 but a decline in 2006–07 to 16,764,000 trips. The ACT Government continues to add to its fleet of compressed natural gas (CNG) buses, numbering 54 in June 2007.

The ACT Sustainable Transport plan addresses transport needs to 2026 and works towards achieving sustainability by incremental change.  Given the current challenges in relation to fuel costs and climate change, it seems timely to question if more needs to be done. A white paper on long-term innovative sustainable transport options for the ACT could be prepared, and be the basis for a discussion with the community, to inform possible amendments to the ACT Sustainable Transport Plan. A multidiscipline Taskforce (independently chaired) could be tasked with identifying the innovative transport options, discussing these with the community and developing the white paper the Government to consider.

While freight movement is essential in assessing trends in transport efficiency, data on freight tonnage arriving and leaving the ACT by road, rail and air were not available for this report. Passenger travel by rail and air is not included for the same reason, nor is motor transport either public (including a taxi with a single passenger) or the personal car (including that of a large family).

What the results tell us about the ACT

We still rely on the car

Private motor vehicles remain the favoured mode of transport in the ACT. In 2006, the ACT recorded one of the lowest average kilometres travelled per vehicle (13,600 km, down from 15,100 km in 2001), with the national average 14,600 km (calculated using the total kilometers travelled divided by the number of registered vehicles; Australian Bureau of Statistics 2006c). While the total kilometres travelled in the ACT declined between 2003 and 2006 (from 3,199,000 km to 3,014,000 km), the number of vehicles increased (from 212,072 to 220,827).

Between 2004 and 2006, the ACT was the only jurisdiction to record an overall decline in vehicular travel. The decline was from reduced interstate travel, not local travel (Australian Bureau of Statistics 2006d, Table 7). Canberrans are taking fewer car trips outside the ACT. If they are staying at home, the environment is benefitting; if they have adopted air travel, that is not so. There are no statistics on air travel to allow conclusions to be drawn.

Much of metropolitan Canberra was designed in the 1960s to depend on car transport until a future trunk public transport system was developed (TAMS 2004). Compared with other Australians traveling to and from work, Canberrans used their cars more (81.1% against a national figure of 76.1%), used public transport less (7.9%, 15.2% nationally), but walked (4.9%, 4.0% nationally) and cycled (2.5%, 1.1% nationally) significantly more. Since 2001, there has been a decrease in the ACT in use of the car (from 82.6%) and an increase in use of public transport (from 6.7%), walking (from 4.2%) and cycling (from 2.3%) (Australian Bureau of Statistics 2006a). While cars continue to be used for most of Canberran's work trips, there has been a small improvement in the mode share with car driver numbers overall slightly declining with mode shares for public transport and walking increasing (Figure 1).

Figure 1: Mode share for car drivers, 1976–2006

Source: Mees, Sorupia and Stone 2007, Figure 2 page 3

Canberra, like most major cities except Perth and Hobart, has experienced a decline in car-pooling (Figure 2; Mees, Sorupia and Stone 2007:7).This is of concern as car-pooling should be the easiest form of sustainable travel to arrange, because it simply involves filling empty seats in cars that are already travelling (Mees, Sorupia and Stone 2007:7). While there has been a decline it must be emphasised that Canberra (and Hobart) have the highest rates of car-pooling of all Australian capitals. This is probably due to shorter driving distances and lowest usage of public transport.

Figure 2: Mode share for car passengers (car pooling), 1976–2006

Source: Mees, Sorupia and Stone 2007, Figure 3 page 7

Fuel emissions

The proportion of Australian unleaded petrol vehicles is highest in the ACT and continues to grow, from 81.3% in 2004, 83.8% in 2005 to 85.7% in 2006.

The ACT has the smallest proportion of diesel vehicles (4% in 2004, 4.2% in 2005 to 4.4% in 2006; Australian Bureau of Statistics 2006d).

Car ownership declined

Both nationally and in the ACT the proportion of passenger vehicles registered declined; however, the ACT retained the highest proportion (86.1% in 2004, 85.9% in 2005 and 85.6% in 2006) compared to the national proportion (49.07% in 2004, 45.76% in 2005 and 43.57% in 2006).

Taxis

Canberra Cabs (with a fleet of 134 taxis), Elite Taxis (Canberra) (with a fleet of 82 taxis), and Cabxpress (with a fleet of 21 taxis) provide taxi dispatch services in the ACT (Table 1). Almost all of these taxis are independently owned and operated, and compete for hirings throughout the Territory. Additionally, Canberra Cabs operates four wheelchair accessible taxis, while Cabxpress operates 14 (Australian Bureau of Statistics 2007). Total Australian Bureau of Statistics taxi figures are different from Table 1, as the latter includes 20 balloted taxi licenses (May 2007) not covered in the Australian Bureau of Statistics reporting period.

During the reporting period, taxis became a target of criticism in Canberra, with lengthy waits despite an increase in the number of taxis registered. Canberra Cabs was forced to modify an ineffective automated voice system that increased travelers' frustrations.

Table 1: Taxi numbers in the ACT, 2003–07
Year Number of standard taxis Number of wheelchair access
2003 217 26 (22 operating – 4 surrendered)
2004 217 26 (22 operating – 4 surrendered)
2005 217 26 (22 operating – 4 surrendered)
2006 237 (20 balloted May/Aug 06) 26 (22 operating – 4 surrendered)
2007 257 (20 balloted May 07) 26 (14 operating – 12 surrendered)

Source: Office of Transport, Department of Territory and Municipal Services, 2008

Data on taxi use for this indicator are lacking at present. Data are needed on person per kilometre travelled; peak usage figures to assess effects such as the beginning and end of the parliamentary sitting week; and a sample survey of time and place of pickup, and destination, to enable distance, accessibility and purpose of journey to be assessed.

More people cycle or walk to work

Cycling and walking have the lowest environmental impacts and the greatest health benefits of all transport modes and require only a modest investment in infrastructure. In Canberra walking is pleasant, due to the streetscapes and high outdoor air quality, and is generally safe. Canberra is experiencing an upward trend in walking as a means of travelling to work; a 17% increase between 2001 and 2006 (Figure 3).

Figure 3: Mode share for walking, 1976–2006

Graph of mode share for walking, 1976 to 2006

Source: Mees, Sorupia and Stone 2007, Figure 7, page 11

The increase in ACT cycling numbers follows implementation of the first stage of government initiatives during the reporting period, including the Woden–Dickson on-road cycle lane project. Canberra leads the nation in terms of mode share for cycling to work (Figure 4). (Mees, Sorupia and Stone 2007:11).

Figure 4: Mode share for cycling, 1976–2006

Graph of mode share for cycling, 1976 to 2006

Source: Mees, Sorupia and Stone 2007, Figure 8, page 11

The increasing trend toward higher density inner-city living means there is significant potential to further increase the proportion of trips made by walking or cycling. Given the many benefits of walking and the likely densification of our urban form it may be worth developing an ACT walking plan to ensure this mode of transport is encouraged wherever possible; such a plan could include giving pedestrians priority over vehicles at key locations.

Public transport a vital resource

Efficient public transport is essential to equitable access, particularly for aged or disabled people, and for those living in outer suburbs. In the ACT use of public transport to travel to place of work or study was 7.9% in 2006, with the national average being 14% (Mees, Sorupia and Stone 2007).

TAMS assumed responsibility for transport planning and strategy from the ACT Planning and Land Authority in April 2007 at which time, work commenced on developing a Park and Ride Strategy and a Strategic Public Transport Network Plan. The large-scale 'Travelsmart' program targeted about 11,000 households; more than 43% of people participated and achieved a 12.7% reduction in car travel. Given the important link between land use, transport and sustainability it is important that policies and plans in these areas be overtly linked. There are opportunities for such links to be made stronger in the ACT than they are at present.

Measures of transport efficiency require better data than is available. For example, calculations of persons per kilometre travelled (a 'PK ratio') and of daily commuting time for both public and personal transport would enable better assessment of progress toward more sustainable transport systems and move beyond assumptions that public transport is necessarily more efficient than personal transport. Such an assumed efficiency would not necessarily be the case where, for example, public transport includes a taxi carrying a single passenger and personal transport includes a car carrying a large family or other group. To achieve an efficient transport system it is important to have a strategically planned public transport system as well as a system that is integrated with land use planning.

Bus use

Despite a decline in concession and school passenger boardings in 2004–05, ACTION bus use increased during the reporting period, from 16,305,000 in 2003–04 to 16,928,000 in 2005–06. While adult boardings continued to increase in 2006–07, total boardings declined (to 16,764,000), with another fall in concession and school passengers.

Service schedules, efficient route and travelling time were the key reasons people in the ACT reported for not using public transport. The proportions reporting this in the ACT (bus service schedule 31% and travel time 24%) were the highest nationally in this survey in 2006 (Australian Bureau of Statistics 2006b).

An assessment of the new ACTION network introduced at the end of 2006 will be included in the next state of the environment report. This new network and its subsequent modification caused concern to various groups within the community and received considerable media attention.

The ACT Government continues to add to the fleet of compressed natural gas (CNG) buses, numbering 54 in June 2007 with an addition 16 on order for 2008. At 30 June 2007, the ACTION bus fleet comprised 379 vehicles, namely:

  • 54 Scania CNG buses
  • 20 Irisbus diesel buses
  • 280 Renault diesel buses
  • 25 Dennis Dart Midi diesel buses.

Diesel emissions are reducing under new manufacturing guidelines, but CNG buses produce less particulate pollution. In 2004 ACTION joined the Greenhouse Challenge to reduce its greenhouse gas emission by 5% chiefly through use of CNG buses.

Data indicating trends in the number of people travelling to and from Canberra by rail and by air were not available for this indicator.

Freight movement is essential in assessing trends in transport efficiency; data on freight tonnage arriving and leaving the ACT by road, rail and air were not available for this indicator. At the end of the last reporting period, 96% of inwards freight and 99% of outwards freight was being transported by road.

Sustainable transport options

Progressing sustainable transport options is a key challenge, given the continued high level of car dependence in the ACT (a major contributor to the high per capita use of non-renewable energy).

Progress in implementing the key actions in the ACT Government's Sustainable Transport Plan for the ACT (TAMS 2004), produced at the end of the last reporting period, is reported on in Appendix A. On current trends it appears that the targets in this plan are likely to be achieved, refer to Table 2 however, data was not available on the effect of these targets in actually achieving reductions in greenhouse gas emissions or energy efficiency or progress towards a carbon neutral transport.

While the targets in the Sustainable Transport Plan provide useful information on mode of travel they do not provide information on their effect on energy use, greenhouse gases or how efficiency of the mode of transport.  Accordingly, additional targets are needed, such as energy efficiency per person or persons per kilometre travelled (a 'PK ratio') and of daily commuting time for both public and personal transport.  It is likely that an integrated system that maximizes the occupancy rate of private vehicles, uses taxis, buses (or/and potentially other forms of mass transit), walking and cycling may yield the best results. The ACT needs a more environmentally sustainable transport infrastructure that moves beyond a public/private transport dichotomy and prioritises transportation on measures such as a person per kilometer per unit of energy type calculus; to a degree the T2 lane system is an example of this approach.

Table 2:  Sustainable transport plan targets (journey to work trips)
Mode 2001 Target 2006 Actual 2011 Target 2026 Target
Walking 4.1% 4.9% 6% 7%
Cycling 2.3% 2.5% 5% 7%
Public Transport 6.7% 7.9% 9% 16%
Total 13.1% 15.3% 20% 30%

Source: TAMS 2004

The Sustainable Transport Plan addresses transport needs to 2026 and works towards achieving sustainability by incremental change.  Given the current challenges in relation to fuel costs and climate change, it seems timely to question if more needs to be done. A report on long-term innovative sustainable transport options for the ACT could be prepared, and be the basis for a discussion with the community, to inform possible amendments to the ACT Sustainable Transport Plan. Options could range from establishing a Canberra-wide vehicle fleet that was run on renewable energy or be at least significantly more energy efficient then the present fleet; developing commercial park and ride facilities; fostering some form of mass transit (other than or in addition to buses or by using buses differently); identifying ways to better integrate taxi and bus services, to better inform the community of travel options and parking availability etc. through the use of new technologies. The cost and means by which options could be implemented would need to be identified. A multidiscipline Taskforce (independently chaired) could be tasked with identifying the innovative transport options, discussing these with the community and developing a report for the Government to consider.

Data sources and references

Information and data on bus use were provided by ACTION in 2007.

Australian Bureau of Statistics Australian Bureau of Statistics 2007, Australian Capital Territory in Focus, 2007, cat. no. 1307.8, available at <http://www.abs.gov.au/Ausstats/abs@.nsf/7d12b0f6763c78caca257061001cc588/25198a95a2ab8db4ca2571e600206bf5!OpenDocument>

Australian Bureau of Statistics Australian Bureau of Statistics 2006a, Census 2006, Method of Travel to Work, cat. no. 2901.0, available at <http://www.abs.gov.au/AUSSTATS/abs@.nsf/Latestproducts/019FF0904A931ED6CA25729E0008A889?opendocument>

Australian Bureau of Statistics Australian Bureau of Statistics 2006b, Environmental Issues: people's views and practices, cat. no. 4602.0, available at <http://www.abs.gov.au/AUSSTATS/abs@.nsf/ProductsbyReleaseDate/24A4FB584DEF51CFCA2573A80011CDB6?OpenDocument>

Australian Bureau of Statistics Australian Bureau of Statistics 2006c, Survey of motor vehicle use, Australia, 1 Nov 2004 to 31 Oct 2005, cat. no. 9208.0, available at <http://www.abs.gov.au/AUSSTATS/abs@.nsf/allprimarymainfeatures/7D2E1D0D13131540CA2573780012FEA7?opendocument>

Australian Bureau of Statistics Australian Bureau of Statistics 2003, Survey of Motor Vehicle Use, Oct 2002, cat. no. 9208.0, available at <http://www.abs.gov.au/AUSSTATS/abs@.nsf/allprimarymainfeatures/B9ED0B43AA7CDDE4CA256F3300784954?opendocument>

Australian Bureau of Statistics Australian Bureau of Statistics 2004, Survey of Motor Vehicle Use, Oct 2003, cat. no. 9208.0, available at <http://www.abs.gov.au/AUSSTATS/abs@.nsf/allprimarymainfeatures/3EAAB384EF8D2F62CA2570800072002D?opendocument>

Australian Bureau of Statistics Australian Bureau of Statistics 2005, Survey of Motor Vehicle Use, Oct 2004, cat. no. 9208.0, available at

Australian Bureau of Statistics Australian Bureau of Statistics 2006d, Survey of Motor Vehicle Use, 01 Nov 2004 to 31 Oct 2005, cat. no. 9208.0, available at <http://www.abs.gov.au/AUSSTATS/abs@.nsf/allprimarymainfeatures/2FEC26084579A43BCA2571E1001E7F28?opendocument>

Australian Bureau of Statistics Australian Bureau of Statistics 2007, Survey of Motor Vehicle Use, 12 months ended 31 October 2006, cat. no. 9208.0, available at <http://www.abs.gov.au/AUSSTATS/abs@.nsf/allprimarymainfeatures/63AF63FDCC1078F4CA2571E1001F0FF6?opendocument>

Mees P, Sorupia E and Stone J 2007, Travel to work in Australian capital cities, 1976–2006: an analysis of census data, University of Melbourne, available at <http://www.abp.unimelb.edu.au/aboutus/pdf/census-travel-to-work-1976-2006.pdf>

TAMS Territory and Municipal Services 2004, Sustainable Transport Plan for the ACT, ACT Government, available at <http://www.tams.act.gov.au/move/sustainable_transport_plan_actions/sustainable_transport_plan>

TAMS Territory and Municipal Services 2007, Annual Report 2006–07, ACT Government, available at <http://www.tams.act.gov.au/live/about_our_department/annual_reports/tams_annual_report_2006-07> 

Appendix A: Sustainable Transport Plan Goals and Progress

No. Action Progress
Goal 1: Reduce the need for and length of travel whilst meeting community demands for accessibility, through integrated transport and land use.
1.1 Encourage a mix of uses and higher density development in and around centres and at key nodes along transport corridors. Development Control Plan was developed for Flemington Road corridor (Gungahlin to City) to enable higher density and mix use.
Belconnen Town Centre Planning Study completed for transit oriented development.
Strategic land releases in City and town centres
Goal 2: Shift the balance of travel from private vehicles towards greater use of walking, cycling and public transport
2.1 Improve and maintain community paths to encourage walking trips and walking for recreation. Provided $3 million to improve and maintain community paths including $350,000 per annum on the construction of new footpaths.
To improve our cycling and walking path networks Capital Upgrade Works budget 2008-09 provided $738,000
2.5 Promote walking in TravelSmart programs and Travel Access Plans for households, employers, schools, universities and other such institutions. Completed TravelSmart programs for 11,000 households, more than 6,000 employees and involved some 30 schools (see further details below).
2.6 Ensure a focus on 'walkability' and pedestrians in master plans for town centres and suburbs and in urban design guidelines and planning advice. Developed City West master plan and Canberra Central programs each with a focus on 'walkability'.
2.7 Prepare a master plan for trunk cycle routes and develop cycling routes and paths to provide an integrated cycling network, including on-road and off-road cycling opportunities. Completed a Ten Year Master Plan. Constructed cycle facilities ($350,000 per annum) as part of the Capital Upgrade program.

Improving Cotter Road on-road cycle connections Capital Upgrade Works budget 2008-09 to 2009-10 provides $2.338 million

Completing Jerrabomberra wetlands cycling and walking path $0.9 million in 2008-09
2.8 Update and distribute the map showing cycling routes and facilities. Completed and distributed a walking and cycling map.
2.10 Develop a bicycle parking guideline that ensures adequate parking, showers and lockers are provided in new developments. Completed a new bicycle parking guideline for new developments.
2.11 Promote cycling in TravelSmart programs and Travel Access Plans for employers, schools, universities and other such institutions. Completed as per 2.5
2.12 Promote commuter cycling to recreational cyclists and infrequent cyclists through advertising and TravelSmart programs. Undertaken as part of the TravelSmart program (see further details below)
2.13 Improve opportunities to combine cycling trips with bus trips, including trialling of bikes on buses. Implemented trial of bike racks on buses.  Continue to implement bikes on buses initiative, budget 08 provided funding of $0.189M from 2008-2012
2.14 Ensure provision for cycling routes, paths, parking and other facilities in centre master plans and subdivision designs. On-going
2.15 Upgrade and implement selective bus right of way measures on all trunk public transport routes to improve trunk services Constructed transit lane along Flemington Road between Sandford Street and Federal Highway.
2.16 Progressively construct the trunk public transport routes for transit services and enact measures to encourage more intensive land use activities to develop around stations and at interchanges. Completed Belconnen Town Centre planning study and Cohen Street extension.
2.17 Ultimately, develop a separate right-of-way system on all trunk routes. This right of way should be able to be used by bus, light rail or other future technologies. Completed Preliminary Assessment for right of way system between Belconnen and City.
Completed feasibility study for right of way system along Northbourne Avenue.
2.18 Provide public transport services with priority systems into newly planned and developing areas, including areas identified or development in The Canberra Spatial Plan. Progressing a strategic public transport network study including newly planned areas such as Molonglo and East Lake to ensure the infrastructure and service conditions will be available for future strategic public transport system.
2.19 Improve the existing public transport services through:
service improvements – including more express services, higher frequency services on trunk corridors, more direct routes and opportunities to combine several modes
reduced travel times, through bus and taxi priority measures
improved facilities - including better interchanges, shelters, 'park and ride' and intermodal opportunities
improved customer information – 'real time' and other systems, smart card ticketing technology and improving the legibility of services.
Introduced ACTION Xpresso services in 2005. 
Enhanced services through the introduction of "Network 08".  Implementing ACTION's Network '08 The budget process provided $38.15 million from 2007-12
Implemented 'Bike and Ride' as part of the inter-town routes.
Prepared a draft "Park and Ride" strategy.
2008-09 budget provided about $0.5m to construct a "park and ride" and "bike and ride" facility in Mawson
Introduced transit lane on Flemington Road
2008-09 budget provided funding to investigate additional bus lanes.  $3.5 million identified from 2008 - 2012
Implemented 'Ads on Bus Shelters': New Adshell contract will provide 240 shelters over the next three years and maintenance over the next 15 years.
Undertaking a study of 'park and ride' strategy.
Completed concept design for real time information system. Funding commitment made for new ticketing system.
The budget provided funding of $16.5 million from 2008 – 2011 for Belconnen town centre – Cohen Street extension and bus system improvement
2.20 Investigate demand-responsive feeder services, initially for after-hour services and possibly for other feeder services. Completed a study on Demand Responsive transport system. ACTION Trialled flexi bus service.
2.23 Implement TravelSmart and Workplace Access Plans for workplaces, households and schools. Completed as per 2.5
Goal 3: Reduce the per capita total cost of the transport system including external costs
3.1 Encourage the use of more resource-efficient and low emission private motor vehicles through regulation and pricing of vehicle registration, reduction in stamp duty etc. Undertaking a project on legislation and system changes for differential stamp duty for "green vehicles".
3.2 Complete the conversion of the ACTION bus fleet to CNG fuel and continue to upgrade the ACTION fleet to achieve lower greenhouse gas emissions and better fuel-efficiency. Acquired 54 CNG buses for ACTION's fleet. A draft report on a 15 year strategy for fleet replacement is with Treasury and will provide the basis to reduced emissions with particular attention paid to fuel type.
3.3 Implement the proposed reform of taxi and hire car legislation to increase the level of competition. Completed a new taxi licence release program, adding 40 new taxis to the ACT taxi fleet. A second taxi network was accredited in early 2007.
3.4 Implement the ACT Road Safety Strategy. Released ACT Road Safety Strategy 2007-2010.
Goal 4: Ensure the transport system contributes positively to the ACT economy
4.2 Revise parking guidelines to reduce development costs of parking, improve the management of community parking resources and support sustainable transport goals. Released Draft Parking Strategy consistent with this goal
Goal 5: Ensure the transport system helps make Canberra a more socially just city.
5.1 Introduce more demand-responsive transport services particularly for feeder services and outside of peak times. Amended Road Transport (Public Passenger Services) Act 2002 to facilitate provision of demand responsive transport services.

Trialled Flexibus services.
5.2 Review and develop standards to ensure a reasonable coverage and level of public transport services across metropolitan Canberra. Reviewed service standards for application to future network design.
5.4 Continue to implement the ACT Accessible Public Transport Action Plan to ensure the public transport system is progressively made fully accessible. Accessible bus purchases: progressively upgrading the bus fleet to meet disability standards $49.5 million from 2008 – 2012
5.5 Recognise the importance of concessions for use of public transport. The budget 08 is providing concession travel for seniors on the new ACTION bus network $1.173 million from 2008  – 2012
The budget 08 is providing free travel on ACTION buses for residents over the age of 75 years $0.5 million from 2008-2012
Goal 6: Provide for future needs by maintaining future options and flexibility in the transport and land use systems.
6.1 Retain and protect the trunk corridors and provide options for trunk services through the town centres and major activity centres. On-going
6.2 Ensure planning for trunk corridors is capable of accommodating light rail and other technologies in future. Considered as part of the planning for transitway (Belconnen to City). Molonglo public transport corridor is planned with this goal in mind.
6.4 Improve the quality of data for transport planning and management. Re-engineered and enhanced transport modelling capabilities with state of the art modelling package.
Goal 7: Support a more sustainable urban structure and form, which will increase accessibility, facilitate an improved quality of life and respond more effectively to environmental factors.
7.1 Introduce a Transport Impact Assessment process to ensure sustainable transport goals and strategies are incorporated into land use planning at structure plan and local planning levels. On-going. Being undertaken as part of the integrated transport assessment.
7.2 Implement the Australian Transport Council's National Charter of Integrated Land Use and Transport Planning into the ACT Government transport and land use planning. On-going
Goal 8: Ensure ACT Government resources and policies contribute to sustainable transport through a more sustainable transport fleet and initiatives to support employees' use of sustainable transport
8.1 Improve the sustainability of the ACT Government vehicle fleet through the use of more fuel-efficient vehicles and other measures. Addressing through whole of (ACT) Government policy.
Goal 9: Price transport use to make it efficient, equitable and transparent.
9.1 Manage and price parking to encourage greater use of public transport, cycling and walking, particularly for commuter and peak period trips and to encourage more efficient use of motor vehicles. Also ensure the pricing of parking reflects the costs of parking supply and management. At the same time, pricing policies should ensure centres are not unreasonably constrained and remain competitive. Developing a Parking Strategy considering these factors.

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